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Wednesday, May 13, 2009

is pretending to be pregnant a fireable offense?

TV Guide Magazine would like to know: Is pretending to be pregnant in order to get out of work a fireable offense? Apparently a character on Rules of Engagement (a show I've never heard of) did exactly that, and TV Guide wants to know how this would fly in real life.

I'm quoted answering this question like the curmudgeon I am in their May 4 issue. Here's the blurb in its entirety:

6 comments:

bg said...

I absolutely agree with you!

You break my trust, I break your continued employment. Period.But I'd take that a step further: TV Guide has an employee who had to ask the question, presumably because he or she didn't know the answer, and moreover thought your answer to the question constituted something worthy of an article. My advice to TV Guide: Watch that employee.

HR Wench said...

Oh man, you are really famous now! :)

Henning Makholm said...

TV Guide has an employee who had to ask the question, presumably because he or she didn't know the answer,Huh? TV Guide has a writer who knows that when writing for print, it is considered infinity times better to quote a supposed expert for an opinion than it is just to assert it. (Unless what you're writing is explicitly presented as a bylined opinion piece).

This writer may or may not be above shopping around for an expert who will give the answer she wants to find a source for ...

Kerry said...

I'd can her butt in about three seconds.

Anonymous said...

I know lying isn't kosher but...I can sympathize with the character on the TV show. I've had to fill in for umpteen pregnant co-workers who maximized maternity leave, PTO and what not to be out on paid leave for 6 + months. And did I mention that when they came back we gave them the same raise and bonus as those that were working so that "we wouldn't treat pregnant employees differently." And don't even get me started on the amount of cash I've had to shell out for co-worker baby showers. When do I get my turn? Sigh...

raskal said...

AAM's advice is spot on. Employees claiming medical conditions they don't have to obtain benefits or accomodations falls under intentional and deliberate fraud. Mostly it's stupid game playing and a lie that would tick me off esp if the employee required accomodations. I'd fire their butt under my personal rule of 'WTH do you think you can pull here' to set an example.